Thursday, February 11, 2021

Using Self-renewal Best Practices Presentation

 


Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Essential, Stress Reducing Self-Care

Do you find yourself feeling guilty when you think about taking time for yourself? As a parent you have a million other things that need to be done - laundry, dishes, helping with homework, making dinner, driving the kids around and the list goes on.

Do you feel like there isn’t enough time to get everything done each day? Is your schedule crammed full? Does adding your own self-care to that list make it feel even more overwhelming?

Taking care of yourself is always important and it’s even more critical if you are feeling overwhelmed. Nobody will do it for you – in fact others are likely to encourage you to put even more on your plate that has nothing to do with taking care of yourself!

What is self-care?

(finish reading article on PricelessParenting.com



Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Increasing Motivation To Do Homework

 
Do your children struggle to get their homework done each day? Do they refuse to do it sometimes? If you are in the habit of struggling with your kids over homework, it’s no fun for anyone.

The good news is you can change these dynamics! One school counselor reported that she saw many kids who refused to do their homework. When she asked what they would do if their parents left homework up to them, almost all the kids replied they would do their homework. They explained they did not want to disappoint their teachers, miss their recess time or be embarrassed by not having it done.

Removing Power Struggles Over Homework

When your kids focus on resisting you, they can’t feel these internal motivations. How can you reduce your children’s resistance and increase the likelihood of their homework getting done? 

 (finish reading on PricelessParenting.com)  



Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Teaching Kids Who To Trust

Who do you trust? Who should your kids trust? Being able to trust is foundational for close relationships. Families thrive when everyone can trust each other.

When there is trust, you feel safe sharing your innermost thoughts and feelings. You can take risks because you know the other person won’t take advantage of your vulnerability. You know they will be there for you.

Building Trust

Trust builds over time through everyday interactions. From the moment of their birth, your children need you to be reliable for keeping them safe and fed. As they grow and ask challenging questions, your honest answers increase their trust. When you make promises and follow through on those promises, you also build trust. 

(finish reading article on PricelessParenting.com



Saturday, September 26, 2020

Choosing Growth Rather Than Resistance to Reality Shifts

Reality shifts can happen slowly like the seasons changing or quickly like an earthquake. Either type of change can leave you feeling disoriented and unstable. How do you handle these uncomfortable feelings? How do you help your kids embrace the new reality?

Kids benefit from stability and structure. For example, having a consistent schedule creates structure in their days. Knowing what they will be doing and who they will be with each day provides a level of comfort.

What happens when their stable platform is rocked? It might be rocked by things like a new sibling, a move, a new school, a pandemic, or a divorce. How do you help your kids navigate through these changes? 

(finish reading article on PricelessParenting.com)

 



Thursday, August 27, 2020

Healthy Limits, Healthy Kids

One life skill all kids need to learn is how to set limits for themselves. You are their first teacher in how to set healthy limits.

While your kids may complain about your limits, these parameters provide a sense of safety. Your kids know where the boundaries are. They know you are strong enough to enforce those boundaries.

Setting limits is necessary in your role as a parent. Your kids will push back and resist at times. At this point some parents give in to avoid the stress of enforcing the limits. These parents have reported undesirable results like:

  • 3-year-old who regularly goes to bed at midnight
  • 5-year-old who only eats goldfish crackers and macaroni and cheese
  • 8-year-old who is obese
  • 11-year-old who is addicted to watching porn
  • 13-year-old who is up until 4:00 AM on the internet
  • 14-year-old who does not help around the house
  • 16-year-old who is failing classes

All these situations developed over weeks, months, or years. You can occasionally bend the rules. However, problems develop when you consistently don't enforce healthy limits. You experience the immediate relief of your child being satisfied but is it worth the future consequences?

Setting Essential Limits

 (finish reading article on PricelessParenting.com)